About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 8
CNNW 8
CSPAN2 8
CSPAN 5
CNN 2
FBC 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
(narrator) henry moore was the world's foremost sculptor for 40 years. his creative legacy in many ways exemplifies the cultural ambitions of his time. he was every bit as surprising and complex as his art, a miner's son who refused a knighthood, a sculptor who caught the public's interest with his drawings, d ryt with a common touch. (henry moore) recently, there was a book published on my work by some jungian psychologist, a very good writer named nauman. i think the title was the archetypal world of henry moore and he sent me a copy, which he asked me to read. but after the first chapter i thought i better stop because it explained too much. and i thought it might stop me from ticking over if i went on and knew it all. (narrator) moore was english to the bone, he carved his reputation in english elm and boxwood, cumberland alabaster, and portland stone. when his art made him wealthy he turned to bronze and marble, but he never turned away from england. for all its rain and taxes it w h and he cleared a new path for english art. (anthony caro) you look at the history of english a
correspondent dana bash, steven moore of the "wall street journal" and jackie calms of the "new york times." 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. [ tylenol bottle ] me too! and nasal co [ tissue box ] he said nasal congestion. yeah...i heard him. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> joining me around the table, cnn's congressional correspondent dana bash, mark zandy and he has a new book out "paying the price" steven moore of the "wall street journal" and jackie calms of the new york tiles. thank you all for joining us. let's jut as
writer steve moore also joins the panel. so, steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets enough attention. >> i agree. >> paul: the reforms taking place across the country in a lot of states. who are the stars you're looking at? >> i entirely agreement with your premise, paul. if you look at, talk about the demise of the republicans on the national levels we're not seeing that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources
economic writer steve moore also joins the panel. steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets of attention. the reforms taking place across the country in a>> lot of states. who are the stars you are looking at? >> i entirely agree with your premise, paul. if you talk about the demise of the republicans on the national level, we are not really seeing that on the state level. 30 republican governors today in america. the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina. so the south now is almost entirely republican whereas justen 25 years ago it was pretty entirely democratic. it is not just the south. states like utah and idaho and others. >> what are they doing with that power? that's the interesting thing. >> so they have the power, and they are using it. you have states like kansas and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you have a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican and are aggressively promoting pro energyer drilling policies to get at the pir natural resources. and the big story you ment
. coming up, julia louis dreyfus, but first julianne moore on recreating the 2000 election in the film adaptation a game change. that's straight ahead when we return. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. >>> the book game change was itself a game changer in the role of political books. the task of adapting the pages into a compelling movie was likely a daunting
presidential candidate howard dean, steve moore of the "wall street journal" editorial board, author of "return to prosperity." steve, i begin with you. we have from the "wall street journal" editorial page costco's dividend ta dividend as tax epiphany. taxes matter, steve. even though there are a lot of people in this world who think not. >> they matter a whole hell of a lot. it was very predictable these companies would be starting to pay deluges of dividends now. if you pay them now your shareholders only pay 15%. if you wait six weeks they have to pay as high as 40, 42, 45% depending on where that rate ends up. so taxes do matter. it's affecting behavior. let me sayhist my good friend howard dinos this, laimplarry. when he was a governor he cut taxes not raised them to make his state more productive. you should be advising this president not to raise those rates. >> steve i was hoping to get some help from you. you know very well, one of the things we can both agree on the deficit is out of control. >> that's for sure. >> you know as well as i do that the best deal for deficit hawks, leavin
of spending restraight. >> i want to bring stephen moore back into the conversation. a lot of people don't like grover norquist you've defended him. you come from the same place in a lot of things. here's where i take issue. he said increasing taxes avoids the conversation on having the spending discussion. i said i don't think that's causal. i think we can agree we're not having a robust-enough conversation on how to deal with spending in this country and how to make government more efficient. is it a fact by raising taxes we're just not going to have that discussion? >> yeah, i believe so. i believe every time you raise taxes it reduces the pressure to cut spending and i agree with grover on that i want to take issue on one thing you said to grover that i think is a little unfair. the vote we had last week, the job boehner plan b, which actually there was no vote -- >> you know, you've been saying, these guys are just following the instructions of grover nor quest. look, i actually think republicans made a mistake personally in not approving plan b. but you know, the people voted again
, prejudice or what, but a major battle at moore's creek, north carolina, not far from wilmington, north carolina. a british fleet was going to land soldiers at wilmington, and an army formed inland, marching towards the coast to join up with the british regulars. a force that were rebels, but what we call patriots, intercepted them and massacred them at moore's creek, which is -- a blind gull issue where rebels were wait r for them to wipe them out. without the loyalists support, the british troops couldn't land keeping the south free of british control for a few years until they landed at charleston. yes, sir? >> you mentioned that the boston tea party spread south to new york and to other cities. almost sounds as though were the network of people who were having the same thought or inspired one way or the another or working together. i never thought of the boston tea party as being that, but is that really -- >> yes. sam adams set up because there was no other form of communication, set up a series of committees of correspondence in every major city in the country. they started commun
moore. lori moore is the author of three story collections and three novels. the most recent being a aid of the stairs, finalist for the pen faulkner award and the orange prize. for fiction and nonfiction have appeared in "the new yorker," the new york review books, "the new york times," the paris review, the yale review and elsewhere. she's been the recipient that the irish times prize for international fiction, the rea award for a short story, the pen malamud award, the o'henry award and the land and fellowship. she is a member of the american academy of arts and letters and it gives me great pressure to introduce lori moore. [applause] ♪ >> the other members of this year's jury for the national book award in fiction are stacy dur as moe, didn't i'll and janet perry. [applause] why would these otherwise sane, reasonable and brilliant people consent to this juror cracks one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend? while your front porch fills up of packages and your neighbors think you have a terrible late-night on line shopping habit through the entire spring and
rake, only on the money you make on the margin. stephen moore is here from the wall street journal and he's ready to jump out of his skin after i said that. he specializes in telling me why i'm wrong. and our other guest, david johnston wrote "the fine print." stephen, you are our resident anti-tax crusader. i totally agree every penny counts when it comes to your own money. when you compare the taxes most americans paid in past decades i don't get why republicans are screaming bloody murder about this. what would be so bad with the wealthiest among us chipping in a little bit more? i'm emphasizing just a little bit more. >> when you showed that chart of the tax rates that was exactly accurate. we had 70% tax rates in the '70s. that didn't turn out well. then we cut the rates significantly. went down to 50%, 28%. the rates went up to 35%. i would love to see you super impose on that chart the share of taxes paid by the rich. here is the interesting thing. >>> one of the reason the deficit went down is you had a big increase in the number of people making money. they paid more tax.
's christopher lance moore, things didn't go as planned when he allegedly broke into a home in texas. the man holding moore at gun point when he found him at his home. his stepson says moore should be lucky to still be alive. >> it was a bad night probably. he was going to try and run or something and that i was gog have to shoot him or my stepdad would have to shoot him. >> gretchen: so moore now facing burglary charges. brian? >> brian: former republican senator alan simpson can legislate, but i didn't know until now that he can actually dance. ♪ . >> brian: that is fantastic. 81-year-old getting down and drawing attention to the fiscal cliff. he made this as part of a nonpartson group because you can not be partisan and do gangam style. the can kicks back, they're urging young americans to help solve the nation's crisis. simpson was one half of the simpson bowles commission tasked with tackling the debt and deficit. >> gretchen: the reason he didn't kick the can was because he had a plan that you wouldn't have to kick the can. you would actually put our fiscal order better off. speaking
moore of "the wall street journal," the top 10% of income earners in this country pay more income tax proportionally than the top 10% than any other industrialized country. there's not a shortage of tax pain. the key thing is how do you get a system that encourages more creativity to the government and the collecting more. surveys have shown, research has shown countries have low tax rates systems, low tax burden, end up collecting more revenue than those that have high tax rates or raising their tax burden. again, people have more free markets and the government will get its abundant cut as well. the key thing is how do you get the free markets going quite heavy get our freedom and free markets? how do you get them going? it would be fine sponsor remembers what it's world is, not the cover or have today, but by madison and others. >> we've been talking with steve forbes about his new book, "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't" also out on the market is "how capitalism will save us." what's your enthusiasm level but then that romney campaign? >> he w
. dagen: thank you very much. we want to bring in steve moore to ask him quickly if there's enough time to get a deal done. he's senior economics writer at the "wall street journal," author of "who is the fairest of them all" and steve now that i introduced you, we're going to have to go to the new york stock exchange to hear wait till the sun shines which the traders sing every time this time of year. i'm going to pose the question to you. apologies if i need to interrupt you. is there enough time to get a deal done? >> yeah, there is. peter is exactly right that the modus operandi and capitol hill and the white house for the last 30 years is every time they are up against the deadline, they are like the high schoolkid who has to finish thesis paper. they wait till the last minute. so dagen, i'm making a prediction that on december 31st, you and i will probably be talking and i think they will be furiously negotiating and i think they probably wiil reach a deal. let me make one other point if i may, let's say it doesn't happen on december 31st, it's going to happen in january. it is no
chris moore is retiring after res than two years on the job. after less than two years on the wood -- after less than two years on the job. >>> a decision may come on whether sonoma marin area rail transit will get a big chunk of federal transportation money. officials asked for $6.6 million to buy more train cars at this year's prices. however, the sonoma county transportation authority says it only has $10 million in funding. >>> it's 7:38. want to check in with sal. see what's happening in the east bay. pretty busy there, sal. >> it's busy. one of the main reasons is the bay bridge is such a mess. it usually has a chain reaction on all of the freeways that get close to the bay bridge. let's go to the 24 freeway. westbound 24 is busy here in la fayette between walnut creek, you have a lot of slow traffic and right when you get out on the slow side, 580, it's jammed. another stall on the bridge. we've had four broken brown -- dash broken down cars. look at the carpool lane. that's slow. we're looking at delays between 40 minutes and an hour for some cars trying to get into san fra
make on the margin. steven moore is ready to jump out of his skin after i just said what i said. david k. johnson is a pulitzer prize winning journalist. his latest big, how big companies use plain english to rob you blind. steven, while i agree that every penny counts when it comes to your own money, when you compare the taxes most americans paid out in past decades, i don't get why republicans are screaming bloody murder about this. what would be so bad with the wealthest chipping in just a little bit more? >> when you showed that chart of the tax rates and that was exactly accurate. we had 70% rates in the 1970s. by the way, that didn't turn out so well, then we cut the rates significantly. 50%, then 28 and then the rates went up to 35%. but i would love to see you super impose on that chart. the share of taxes paid by the rich. here is the interesting thing. if you put the share paid by the rich, as the share came down, the share paid by the rich went up to almost 40% today. >> doesn't that just mean there are more rich people or that they make more money? >> yep and that's what we
, texas. mayor moore passed away last week after 63 years as richmond's mayor. he was a true texan, a straight shooter who loved his family, good conversation, quayle hunting, ranching -- quail hunting, ranching and texas longhorn football. the last time i talked with mayor moore was richmond's 175th anniversary. my speech was interrupted by trains roaring by. the trains did not dare to interrupt mayor moore. i asked him, how can i do that? he said, give it time. give it time. he gave richmond time. the time of his life. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> to ask unanimous consent address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from california is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to announce the discovery of a new break through in mathematics of the theory of vector bundles. part of the interest comes from its application to quantum mechanics, the theory that makes modern electronics possible, and p
out, i spoke with stephen moore from the "wall street journal". >> looking forward, not backward, the republican dangers, there may be an accelerating economy. you can't simply say obama is bad. you have to have an affirmative message. it has to be economically inclusive. that means i think ruling away from the myth of the heroic entrepreneur as the main hero and also the main victim of the american economy and understand that the people who have been leading big companies are actually doing pretty well. the harm is to the middle. >> stephen, talk to me about this. the fact is we do think the entrepreneur as heroic in the u.s. how do you square that circle? >> i think the backbone is the entrepreneur. i think republicans have to make this connection with workers that, you know, if you hurt the businesses who are hurting jobs, i don't think they've done a good job of doing that. i certainly agree that health care is a big issue. i kind of agree with david that republicans have kind attacked the obama idea. i think reasons have to a very robust alternative that might be rejected in
moore from the "wall street journal." and a contributing editor at "newsweek" and author of a new book, how did he write this so fast "why romney lost. "looking forward, not backward. the republican dangers, there may be an accelerating economy. you can't simply say obama is bad. you have to have an affirmative message. it has to be economically inclusive. that means, i think, moving away from the myth of the heroic entrepreneur as the main hero and also the main victim of the american economy and understand that the people who have been leading big companies are actually doing pretty well. the harm has been done to the american middle which is experiencing slow growth. what we need to see above all are control of health care costs. that's the key to getting middle incomes rising again. >> stephen, talk to me about this. the fact is we do think the entrepreneur as heroic in the u.s. how do you square that circle? >> i think the backbone is the entrepreneur. it's the person who sets out the shingle and employs work eers. i think republicans have to make this connection with workers that
jeffrey moore. >> i did very well. >> you knew the indicators that are used to define recession. they're not cherry-picked. that are very specific. they've been defining them for decades, almost a century. >> what are they? >> they are production, income, sales, broad sales and employment. that is it. and when they peak collectively, that is a telltale sign that you have turned the corner on the business cycle and are headed down. >> what about the -- production has come down. i agree with you. income has come down. sales have come down. employment, however, is still rising. >> well, first off, on production and income, you have not seen the simultaneous decline we have now in over half a century. you've never seen it outside of a recession. and you've always seen it inside of a recession and both of those peaked in july, broad sales thus far the peak is in july. that's the high point. we'll see what happens. unemployment is still rising. that's your best argument -- >> employment is still rising. >> jobs growth is still positive. now, that is not inconsistent with a recession. in thr
's bring stephen moore in. i think you're going to disagree with my notion that government can be all that helpful to our runner. that government can be helpful other than by getting out of the way. i think you're going to suggest lower taxes, lower spending, fewer regulations. for the sake of this argument and analogy, accept that taxes are going up. there are many soifr who is argue that there is not a role for government in this let the markets and private industry handle it. but they haven't, and we've got substandard roads and bridges and electricity and broadband infrastructure. all of this means we're less attractive to business. do you accept that the government has a role to play in the rebuilding of america's infrastructure? >> well, sure. and by the way, i love your optimism, ali, i hope you're exactly right about 2013 and 2014. we've been spending money on the programs. a lot of the school buildings, i mean that's been going on in a large magnitude in the united states. what i like and where we might find some agreement, you know, i do think private-sector dollars can lead
journal" editorial writer steve moore and chrystia free land. i asked ken how you convince lawmakers that infrastructure money is well spent and how do you ensure that the money is, in fact, well spent? >> i think you have to have firm regulatory oversight. it's not something you can just spend the money and walk away from. but there are the electricity grid, water, aging bridges. there's so many things hardening our cyber infrastructure against terrorist attacks and such. many, many things. elt doesn't have to be public money. there's no reason we have to be so statused about this that we can't have more private money. we have telephone companies, cable companies, we did the railroads that way. it doesn't all have to be public money. >> steven is nodding his head vigorously. you're going to disagree with the assertion that government can be helpful. a new analogy. that government can be helpful other than by getting out of the way. i think you'll suggest lower taxes, lower spending, fewer regulations. but let's for the sake of this argument and this analogy accept taxes are going up
bill and it's in the provinces where the nationalistic moore support is increasing the base that he needs to keep onboard and that's another reason why he's acting the way he did on this bill. >> we appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to
. i am at a loss for words when you are done. stephen moore, i do hope you come back and see us soon. >> thank you, sir. stuart: here is an example of what i call tax hypocrisy. costco founder going to save because of the dividend payment this year. not next year, this year. the ceo, he is a very big obama supporter. even spoke at the democratic convention. >> a president who understands what the private sector needs to succeed. a president who takes the long view and makes the tough decisions. that is whh i am here tonight supporting president obama. stuart: supports president obama, supports tax the rich, but does not pay the rich taxes. i say tax hypocrisy and i am being very mild. >> i agree. every time i hear the rich guys say, you know, i want to pay more taxes. i say, you know what, if you want to do that, why don't you donate some money to the country. stuart: he borrows the money -- >> borrowings $3.5 billion. stuart: and then costco was downgraded. >> this kind of payout is done with earnings from a company. money is free right now. stuart: have they no shame, in my persona
moore. this is an important issue in your bill is still needed. now the cftc proposed rule is helpful. there's no question they have created an exception for enter affiliate swaps that applies to nonfinancial end-users. the problem is there are two key issues, two problems not addressed by the cftc will. everyone, nonfinancial end-users have an eight step process or a criteria process financial users must meet and what criteria is posting margin between affiliates. again, if you have been a post variation merger between affiliates, the whole point behind an exemption from clearing requirements is defeated because your costs are roughly similar if you have the margin. second and very importantly there are lots of companies in your district and throughout the country that have treasury hedging centers in the cftc will doesn't do anything to exempt trade. if you have a nonfinancial end-user facing the market, if what that hedging centers set up to do this and turned to swaps, that hedging center would be a financial entity. so now you have a financial to financial swap is not eligible fo
. >> thank you very much. miss moore recognized for five minutes. >> thank you so much, mr. chairman. i just want to pursue the line of questioning mr. neugebauer venter into because it seems to me that you are suggesting that futures are transparent, they're well-regulated and we all know that swaps were not. and now that this new swaps future market is developing, i'm wondering if you are concerned about the regulatory arbitrage of the, only about 50% of margin being required? they're being treated as equivalence, don't you think, don't you think, margin may be just one of the regulatory gaps that exist. wondering what your thoughts are on that? >> one of the innovations in the market in the last few months has been this product, future on a swap. so it's a future, that trades on a futures exchange and it's cleared and its's transparent. but yes, we're taking a look at it to better understand it. it's a new product. if i can call you chairman as well. the chairman said, we're, the market should innovate that we're not deciding future swaps or futures on swaps but we're certainly taking a l
of a standoff continuing at the moment. >> this started when mr. moore ci morsi saying its new constitution would be shielded from >> the situation started on the 22nd of november when morsi issued this decree virtually exempting all presidential decrees from judicial oversight. morsi has said this was necessary to speed up constitutional process. he may well have been right in saying that, but the draconian nature of the decree certainly wasn't perceived by his opponents has really set this up. so therefore the situation has escalated to the point where opposition elements are now viewing the judiciary as really kind of the last bastion of not the old regime, but the last bastion. >> seen as an attempt to implement islamic agenda? >> it may well be the start of that. the language if you look at the constitution is not explicit, though i think there are concerns about how that will be interpreted. i think some of the lapse has been loosened at bit. there are new instances that mf-the perception is that some of the protections in the language have been taken away leaving it open to a greater
shelly moore-capito and congressman greg meeks of new york will join us on the show to talk about the biggest sticking points. at the top of the hour, vice chairman and republican policy committee chairman tom price will be our special guest. "squawk box" coming right back. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> good morning and welcome back to "squawk box
charisma. >> some call her the demi moore of her times. "the new york times," though, described her as an encourageable revolutionist to the end. >> she was indeed. they never gave up their dreams. >> "sasha and emma." >> what does "the new york times" say about this book? >> enormously rich book. a great review. great to have you on. >> thank you for coming on. >> thank you for having me on my favorite show. >> it's about time. >> seriously. >> your favorite show because you get a break from halperin. >> and i enjoy the show. >> she watched the show before i was on it. >> i did. i tried to get him to watch. >> so you were responsible for mark? >> i would say for months, you though, here, here is where it is. >> look at this. >> do you want to see huckabee? >> the better half. >> i said i prefer an aging deejay. >> fantastic. congratulations on so many levels. you must be so pleased. >>> still to come, former british prime minister tony blair joins to us discuss the volatile developments in the midd middle east and thoughts on how the fiscal cliff will impact europe and vice versa.
time is up spent i thank the gentleman from new york. and 42 minutes. ms. moore is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you so much, chairman garrett and ranking member waters. i just want to lobby the sec nctc for the extraordinary work that both agencies have done to this point. it's a herculean task when you consider a point that ranking member waters has driven into the ground, and that is that you're not adequately funded to do the work that we've asked you to do on such a short timeframe. i am concerned about a couple things today that have already been mentioned, and i look forward to hearing from the regulators, the rulemaking process, particularly on h.r. 4235, which is to build and i authored, which removes the requirement that they be indemnified prior to sharing the data with other regulars, including foreign regulars. that sec has testified to the committee that it favors removal of indian education requirements to the sec commissioners have opined on this, and yet the cftc interim guidance on and unification is something that is not being, it raises grave concern among o
? joining me now, senior economics writer or for "the wall street journal" steve moore. steve, thanks for making it in today. >> hi, jamie. we're having a white christmas in chicago. so it is a lot of fun. jamie: i know chicago, burr. the numbers are also pretty chilling for retailers who do what percentage of their business during the holiday season? >> you know, those months of november and december are absolutely crucial, jamie, for the retailers. about 40 to all their business all year is done in those two holiday months. so it's, not very good news that the retail numbers came in, you called them lackluster. and that's probably putting it charitiably. this was the worst year since 2008. it is actually, surprising, jamie, because if you look at some other indicators, consumer confidence had actually bumped up a little bit in the last couple months. we have, i wouldn't read too much into this because other indicators of the economy are looking up right now. jamie: so do you think it's an anomaly that it isn't going up? is it an indication if we go over the fiscal cliff there's conc
from alaska good up, beverly moore, 81-year-old korean war navy veteran. beverly was there because the majority of her modest income comes from social security. she wanted to know how this proposal will strengthen that lifeline for her and thousands of alaskans. in fact, one in nine alaskans receive social security. with my state's population of those 65 and older expanding rapidly, social security will continue to play a key role in supplementing a decent living. if social security was not there for the elderly in alaska, a fifth of them would live below poverty. it's vital for our state. it's vital for all our states and for this whole country. mr. president, i have no illusions that this bill is not going to pass in the final weeks of the 112th congress, but i wanted to get it into the mix, i wanted to make sure that people get the bigger point, and again i would say to my presiding officer -- and he says as well and i know my friend here from oregon is on the floor also. as we talk about the deficit, it has taken center stage right now, we want to highlight one very clear thing
on what we know today. >> steven moore before we open it up to question. glenn mentioned corporate tax reform earlier. warren buffett says that tax rates don't matter of as much as a lot of people pretend, when it comes to companies that and investments and innovation. i suspect you disagree with him. >> it seems at odds with the buffett rule, which suggests that taxes are important. >> for government to have revenue? >> business people oftentimes say that it does not matter. then you get one level of analysis beneath that and they wake up, which is that you are given a spread sheet. if you're on a board, you are given a result. in the calculation that creates that result, there's a whole lot of things like taxes and other costs. if you run sensitivities on analyses based on different formulas you get different outcomes. it's not that it's not important, but you are looking at a broader conclusions rather than getting into the actual details. >> to encourage innovation, what would you do? >> taxes are imbedded in the analysis and people just don't recognize it. second, we have a corpor
markets and see. guy wolf is macro strategist at marex speculation and jim moor yo is on constantly on cnbc. unless there's more than one of him. joining from the cme. as i said, a cnbc contributocon. guy, i'll start with you. i just referenced and we had jason trennert say the same thing, traders used to just mainline like fed 85 billion a month. that used to give us a great -- >> how do you know about that? mainline? >> because they're -- >> because they're addicts, traders. and they don't care about structural. they don't care about anything but gimme, gimme from the fed. they weren't even impressed by 85 billion until 2016. are the benefits of this policy to just not be apparent, and the negative effects, you know, coming more into the fore? >> yeah, i mean. a couple of factors. first is the fed are not the only ones out there quantitative easing. when they started they were the only central bank out there, so it had an unusual effect on their currency. whereas now it's much more -- keeping up with everyone else. as things roll off they have to do more just to keep things neutra
. >> a little kiss. happy holidays. >> to you, as well. >> i saw demi moore just throwing herself at -- anyway, coming up, pictures -- coming up, president obama with a new proposal to avoid the fiscal cliff. but are we really closer? we're going to ask democratic senator kent conrad in a few minutes. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. at your local ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insuran
would your benefits cut by moore thank a quarter. -- by more than a quarter. unless we act, this is not a self-correcting problem. now, there are other things that we need do around social security such as raising the cap on the a income that's taxed. but those who say putting off questions about social security or medicare to some other day refuse to also recognize the reality that none of this self-corrects and that the sooner we start down the path on reform, the sooner that we can make sure the promise of these programs will last. but again, instead of worrying about the potential of a 25% cut for folks who are 46 years old in social security, they talk about the fact that, yes, that there may be some slight cutback in immediate benefits. not, though, 25%, not 3%, not 1%, but .3% decrease in the amount of increase each year. and even with that, there are ways, if we use this tool, to make it more fair and balanced. because we must make sure that we protect the most vulnerable in our society. i was part of a group -- and, again, the presiding officer, i believe, was supp
hikes and spending cuts. joining us from washington, republican congresswoman shelly moore capito. were you privy to everything that was happening yesterday? >> i was shocked when we went into the conference at 7:45 and the speaker, after offering this serenity prayer, said merry christmas, you're going home, we're not putting the vote up, we don't have the votes. i was disappointed, quite frankly. >> really? is it overstating it to say that, you know, some people characterize it that the president was not accepting the surrender of the gop anyway, so why not keep fighting? >> we needed to strengthen the speaker's hand in negotiations and i think by saying and reiterating that we didn't want taxes to go up by 98.1% of the population i think is a strong statement for us to go. we had -- would be moving one of the rates, and i think that that was a concession on our maert and i was disappointed we weren't able to send that over to the senate and say to them, all right. your turn. >> yeah, i know. but all these games. everybody knew the senate wouldn't take it up. the president promised he
of the processors and storage. by the way in storage there's something called moore's law in processing, storage the greater change is double every nine months than 18 months. twice the rate. so but the point is in the technology world you have to think about the companys producing innovation not producing products and services in order to stay ahead of the curve. >> jonathan, you want to pick up on this? >> i'm sorry. i'm a philosopher. i don't know how to innovate. and what strikes me about innovation, of course, is that -- this is something the president gave us a good example a few minutes ago, retroviruses and basic medical science turned into very important, as part of the treatment, and understanding of hiv-aids. years later. if you think of the internet it was packet switching, then turned into the internet and finally the web. there's a myth about americans that we only care about application n fact we are the most effective basic science producers in history. now, the founders, to use an overused cliche, had innovation in their d.n.a. the articles of confederation required standards of
an introduction, shelly moore capito. >> i knew following mario was going to be a problem. but anyway, thank you all for being here. i want to thank the families and the young children who are here. i come from a different viewpoint. i do have a grandchild and i see this through her eyes and the debt that christie talked about is very daunting for her. but i'm also in that middle generation where i'm caring for my parents. they're heavily reliant on medicare and social security and me and our family to support them. and i understand how important those safety net programs are for them. but for these children, if we don't take the opportunity that we have this week, this month, to look at those programs so that when these children are the age of my parents and their children are trying to figure out how to meet those heavy costs of their health care, we will have missed an opportunity that would be unforgivable. and so for my parents, my grandchild and for me and for all the parents and grandchildren and caregivers in this country, we must come with this commonsense plan, we can't ask people arou
liver moore and this was precell phone day. remember the pagers? and i paged lowell wood. he was in washington and he -- within an hour he was sitting in my office. electromagnetic pulse. we have only one brief experience with it in our country. and that was in 1962 and johnston island, the only time we ever debt nailted a weapon above the atmosphere. we had no idea what would happen. it produced an electromagnetic pulse because a lot of disturbances in hawaii which is about 800 miles away. the soviets had a lot more experience than we. they actually developed -- we designed them but never built them, enhanced e.m.p. weapons. a single large nuclear -- i shouldn't say that. because it doesn't have to be a large bomb. because it could be a relatively small bomb that's e.m.p.-enhanced. a single appropriately bomb detonated three miles high over nebraska or iowa would prank et our whole country and -- blanket our whole country and if the e.m.p. lay down was robust enough, it would essentially fry all of our microelectronics. the grid would be down for a year or more. and your car
. (henry moore) recently, there was a book published on my work by some jungian psychologist, a very good writer named nauman. i think the title was the archetypal world of henry moore and he sent me a copy, which he asked me to read. but after the first chapter i thought i better stop because it explained too much. and i thought it might stop me from ticking over if i went on and knew it all. (narrator) moore was english to the bone, he carved his reputation in english elm and boxwood, cumberland alabaster, and portland stone. when his art made him wealthy he turned to bronze and marble, but he never turned away from england. for all its rain and taxes it was h and he cleared a new path for english art. (anthony caro) you look at the history of english art, and it's pretty miserable after constable and turner and so on, and henry, somehow, was competing with braque and picasso and so on. you know, he was in that same league. and so it made people realize you can be an artist - and you can be english. (narrator) sculpture made him famous, his celebrity enshrined in wax at madame tussaud's
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)